Stadiums by Munsey & Suppes
Baseball Basketball Football Hockey
Olympics Race Tracks Soccer Mall
  BALLPARKS.com © 1996-2013 by 
  Paul Munsey & Cory Suppes 
  About BALLPARKS.com 
  Advertising 
  Awards & Publicity 
  Disclaimer 

  Ballparks Virtual Mall 
  CFL Past, Present & Future Stadiums 
  MLB Past, Present & Future Ballparks 
  NBA Past, Present & Future Arenas 
  NCAA Past, Present & Future Stadiums 

  NFL Past, Present & Future Stadiums 

  Giants Meadowlands Stadium 
  Jets Meadowlands Stadium 
  New 49ers Stadium 
  New Arrowhead Stadium 
  New Chargers Stadium 
  New Cowboys Stadium 
  New Los Angeles Stadium 
  New LA Coliseum 
  New Saints Stadium 
  New Vikings Stadium 

  NHL Past, Present & Future Arenas 
  Olympic Past & Future Stadiums 

  National Football League Tickets 

  Arizona Cardinals Tickets 
  Atlanta Falcons Tickets 
  Baltimore Ravens Tickets 
  Buffalo Bills Tickets 
  Carolina Panthers Tickets 
  Chicago Bears Tickets 
  Cincinnati Bengals Tickets 
  Cleveland Browns Tickets 
  Dallas Cowboys Tickets 
  Denver Broncos Tickets 
  Detroit Lions Tickets 
  Green Bay Packers Tickets 
  Houston Texans Tickets 
  Indianapolis Colts Tickets 
  Jacksonville Jaguars Tickets 
  Kansas City Chiefs Tickets 
  Miami Dolphins Tickets 
  Minnesota Vikings Tickets 
  New England Patriots Tickets 
  New Orleans Saints Tickets 
  New York Giants Tickets 
  New York Jets Tickets 
  Oakland Raiders Tickets 
  Philadelphia Eagles Tickets 
  Pittsburgh Steelers Tickets 
  San Diego Chargers Tickets 
  San Francisco 49ers Tickets 
  Seattle Seahawks Tickets 
  St. Louis Rams Tickets 
  Tampa Bay Buccaneers Tickets 
  Tennessee Titans Tickets 
  Washington Redskins Tickets 

  MLB Tickets 
  NASCAR Tickets 
  NBA Tickets 
  NCAA Basketball Tickets 
  NCAA Football Tickets 
  NFL Tickets 
  NHL Tickets 
  Olympic Tickets 
  Soccer Tickets 
  Concert Tickets 
  Golf Tickets 
  Theater Tickets 

  

  

    

    
New Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

Aerial View

  Venue Resources  
Address 3911 South Figueroa Street
Los Angeles, CA 90037
Phone (213) 740-3843
Official Website
Weather
Newspaper
Pictures Satellite View
Trojans Gear
  Calendar / Tickets  
Hotels, Dining & Deals in Los Angeles

  The Facility  
Date Opened May 1, 1923
Major Renovation Future
Ownership
(Management)
Casey Wasserman and AEG
(Casey Wasserman and AEG)
Capacity 70,000
Luxury Suites 140 Suites
Club Seats 10,000
Surface Grass
Cost of Construction $600 million
Stadium Architect TBD
  Other Facts  
Future Tenants Los Angeles Freeways (NFL)
Future
Current Tenants USC Trojans (NCAA)
1923-Present
Former Tenants 1932 Summer Olympics
1984 Summer Olympics
Los Angeles Rams (NFL)
1946-1979;
Los Angeles Dodgers (MLB)
1958-1961;
Los Angeles Chargers (AFL)
1960;
Los Angeles Raiders (NFL)
1982-1994;
Los Angeles Express (USFL)
1983-1985
UCLA Bruins (NCAA)
1928-1981
Los Angeles Aztecs (NASL)
1974-1981
Los Angeles Wolves (USA)
1967
Los Angeles Xtreme
(XFL) 2001
Los Angeles Christmas Festival (NCAA)
1924
Mercy Bowl (NCAA)
1961 & 1971
Population Base 9,000,000
On Site Parking 8,200
Nearest Airport Los Angeles International (LAX)

Championships 3rd

XVIII
1983

Sources: Mediaventures

December 4, 2007

Word is out that USC might be looking at a longer-term plan to move to the Rose Bowl temporarily and then work with local sports moguls Casey Wasserman and AEG to revive previous plans for a new football stadium downtown next to Staples on land AEG owns and provide USC with a state-of-the-art stadium seating around 70,000.

The proposal would give USC significantly enhanced revenue from luxury suites and premium seating licenses, putting it more on par with programs like Notre Dame and Texas. It also puts AEG back in the hunt for a NFL team with a new stadium without taxpayer financing that has been a big stumbling block to previous LA stadium proposals.

The cost of the new facility, put at around $400-$600 million could be paid for by lease revenue bonds floated by USC, which because of it's status as an academic institution with a billion dollar endowment, could service the notes at a steeper discount than what AEG could and earn a sizable return on its investment over the life of the bonds if a NFL team goes into the stadium.

The NFL has also promised at least one Super Bowl to LA should a new stadium be built, which would generate sufficient revenue in a single year to offset 25 percent of the overall cost of the construction bonds.

The only longer-term stumbling block to a NFL team returning has been finding an owner willing to pay the record projected $1 billion franchise fee.

The proposal would also ensure an extension of the Figueroa Corridor master plan, linking USC with the Galen Center and a proposed Exposition Park gateway entrance to the new LA Live complex being built by AEG.

The idea would effectively destroy the Coliseum and Sports Arena and render the Exposition Park area unusable for sports, thereby paving the way for another master plan for turning the area into badly needed mixed use housing and business for the local community and USC which is in desperate need of additional student and faculty housing.

California Governor Gray Davis has begun moves to take over negotiations with the NFL over plans to bring an NFL team back to the city and bypass the commission that oversees the Coliseum where the team would play.

Davis has been talking directly with NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue about the issue and has put a representative into the negotiating process.

The action comes as many, including the NFL, are questioning whether the two competing groups can give the NFL a proposal it can accept by September. That's the deadline set by the league to resolve issues over the Coliseum. The Coliseum was original proposed by a group called New Coliseum Partners, but the NFL also liked a bid by former Walt Disney Co. executive Michael Ovitz. The league told Ovitz to come up with his own plan for the Coliseum and later, after he did, the league told both groups to work together to come up with a common plan.

While the NFL has decided to put a team in Los Angeles, it has not awarded the team to an owner. If the Los Angeles groups fail to create a workable plan, the NFL could put the expansion franchise in Houston where another group has a stadium plan ready to go. The NFL has told that group to stop trying to attract an existing team until the Los Angeles situation is resolved.

The governor has also insisted that while he wants the NFL in Los Angeles, he does not want to spend public money on the deal. That may be a deal-killer because parking is the main problem with both plans.

The Ovitz plan puts parking close to the Coliseum as the NFL wants, but would require significant public funds to build the facility. The New Coliseum Group proposal puts parking more affordably away from the Coliseum, but requires shuttles to get fans in and out. The NFL is against that idea.

The leadership of Los Angeles, both public and private sectors, have come together for the purpose of renovating the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum into a modern, state of-the-art National Football League facility. Built in stages beginning in 1923, the Coliseum has played host to the 1932 and 1984 Summer Olympic Games, along with a number of other significant sporting events, including the first Super Bowl. For these reasons, the Coliseum has been designated as a National Historic Landmark, a State Historical Landmark, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The proposed renovation maintains and enhances the existing character-defining elements of the Coliseum. Decidedly the most important visual and architectural element, the peristyle, will be returned to its original splendor along with the adjacent Coliseum Commission offices. The outside wall will be left intact and once again ivy will adorn its surfaces. The grass berm and tunnel system around the stadium will be left in place and modified only to the extent necessary to create four main entry points into the new facility. (The preservation of these elements could not have been achieved had it not been for the repairs made after the Northridge earthquake.) The external buildings, fencing, and escalators currently surrounding the Coliseum will be removed, providing the new stadium with an inviting, visitor-friendly environment that will only help preserve its status as an architectural icon.

Most of the changes to the Coliseum in its conversion to a modern facility will occur within the existing exterior wall. Virtually everything inside of the wall will be removed to make way for the new three-deck structure. When complete, the new facility will place 70 percent of the seats along the sidelines between the end lines. With a base capacity of approximately 68,000 spectators, the New Coliseum will contain an optimum number of seats for a typical NFL game. With a moveable seating section at the west end of the facility pulled forward, capacity can quickly increase to 72,500 spectators for University of Southern California games. By bringing in a similar-sized seating section and placing it in the peristyle end, capacity can be increased to approximately 80,000 spectators, making the new stadium suitable for NFL Super Bowl games or other events of a significant nature.

The stadium design also allows, with the erection of a stage, a wide variety of concert/performance configurations and capacities. Also, with modifications, the new stadium could play host to another Summer Olympic Games. Overall, the New Coliseum is designed to be a very flexible facility which can be tailored to accommodate a great number and variety of events.

Aerial Shot
The new stadium will consist of three seating decks and two luxury suite levels. As spectators enter the New Coliseum, they will find themselves on the main concourse. From this level, the lower seating deck extends downward for 40 rows to the natural grass playing field. Also on this level, and all within the existing outside wall, will be toilet, concession, and merchandising facilities to accommodate all spectators in the lower bowl.

Immediately above the main concourse level will be the club seating deck. These 18 rows will provide approximately 10,000 club seats in excellent proximity to the action. At the rear of the club deck will be approximately 140 private luxury suites on two levels. Immediately behind the suites will be the club lounge. This area will provide club seat and suite patrons with an elegant atmosphere in which to enjoy a number of activities before and after events at the new stadium. The dramatic two-story space will contain all facilities necessary to accommodate spectators on these levels in a setting of upscale finishes, bars, and furnishings.

Above the two suite levels is the upper concourse and upper seating deck. The upper concourse contains toilet, concession, and merchandising facilities to accommodate all the spectators in the upper deck. This concourse is located in the facility in such a manner that people can look over the existing outside wall and view out to all the happenings in Exposition Park and beyond. The upper deck itself consists of 29 rows and place the majority of spectators between the end zones. This and all levels of seating in the new facility provide superior ssight lineswith unobstructed views to the playing field.

All team and service facilities will be located in the service level below the main concourse on the west side of the new facility, utilizing the existing service entry and tunnel. State-of-the-art team facilities will be located in close proximity to (continued)the playing field and contain all the functions required by an NFL or USC team. All stadium service and storage facilities will also be located on this level and outfitted to meet today's requirements.

With its variety and quality of seating configurations, it is hoped that the design of the new stadium can attract a number of new events, in addition to providing an exciting and superior NFL venue. With this new facility, and its integration into a rejuvenated Exposition Park, the New Coliseum will once again provide Los Angeles with one of the premier sports venues in the nation.

April 24, 1999 (AP) - In what could be the NFL's first $1 Billion deal for a stadium and franchise, the league wants to put a team back in the Los Angeles Coliseum.

NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue made it official yesterday that the 76-year old stadium is the league's choice for its 32nd franchise.

Yet to be determined is who will own the team - developer Ed Roski and his New Coliseum Partners, or Hollywood deal-maker Michael Ovitz, who endorsed the Coliseum last week after abandoning his proposal for a new stadium in suburban Carson.

Tagliabue did not rule out other potential ownership groups emerging.

At a Coliseum news conference, the commissioner also said the league's team owners decided against holding an auction for the expansion franchise, and instead will set a price.

Saying the aim was to make the New Coliseum a reality, Tagliabue added, "If we succeed in doing that, we will be talking about a project that will involve, in round numbers, $1 Billion of investment, in terms of the stadium, the Exposition Park area (site of the stadium) and the ownership of the team."

NFL RIVALS HOPE TO HAVE NEW PLAN TO SHOW LEAGUE NEXT WEEK
July 22, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

Two groups that have been vying for NFL approval of a stadium plan for Los Angeles hope to present a unified proposal to team owners next week in Chicago. The groups, including Eli Broad and Ed Roski on one side and Michael Ovitz on the other, have been working to combine divergent views of how the Los Angeles Coliseum can meet the needs of a new team.

The NFL has awarded a team to Los Angeles, but has not selected an owner. It likes the idea of playing in the Coliseum, but has rejected the original plan put forth by Broad and Roski. The NFL also likes Ovtiz's panache, but also has problems with his plan. The NFL has told the two sides to find a way to compromise or they may switch the franchise to Houston.

The main issue is parking and NFL studies show fans want to be near the Coliseum. Ovitz's plan accomplished that, but with expensive grass-covered parking garages that would have required significant public funding. The Roski/Broad plan required shuttle buses, but little public money. The plan now being considered has only one grass-covered garage while utilizing space at the nearby University of Southern California campus. It also calls on the NFL to invest $150 million in the $400 million project.

NFL owners are expected to review the plan next week, but a decision is not expected until September.

NFL PREFERS OVITZ'S VIEW OF COLISEUM
May 27, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

NFL owners appear to prefer Michael Ovitz's plan for development of the Los Angeles Coliseum into a new sports venue over that proposed by New Coliseum Partners who came up with the idea in the first place.

Ovitz had originally proposed putting a new stadium in Carson, but the NFL preferred a renovated Coliseum and suggested that he join Edward Roski Jr and Eli Broad in their Coliseum effort. Ovitz came up with his own plan and delivered that to NFL owners.

The plan calls for the 68,000-seat stadium to be renovated in the theme of Roman coliseums with a frosted glass rim that is lit at night. Two large towers on each end of the stadium would hold more than 200 luxury suites that also overlook a picnic area and two reflecting pools. A misting system would cool fans, including those sitting in 15,000 proposed club seats.

The venue could be expanded to 92,000 seats to host a Super Bowl. New 27,000-space parking garages that are covered with dirt and grass, add green space to the area. The adjacent sports arena would be razed to make room for the garages.

While Ovtiz and his investment group would fund the $298 million project, public money would be needed for the $225 million parking garage designs. An environmental study would also be needed and that could delay the opening until 2003. Some NFL owners suggested it was more important to come up with the right plan, even if it delayed the team's debut.

The proposal by New Coliseum Partners is less flashy and requires shuttle buses to move fans between parking structures providing 17,000 spaces and the stadium. An NFL study of the Los Angeles market says close-in parking is a must to make the stadium successful.

The NFL has requirements for 25,000 parking close in, but Broad says Los Angeles taxpayers will not pay the cost of the Ovitz design. Broad is better connected politically than Ovitz and many believe his read on the issue is credible. Ovitz, aware of his lack of influence with local political leaders, has been making an effort to court their favor through meetings and parties.

BROAD ASKS OVTIZ TO JOIN FORCES
June 3, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

Eli Broad has asked Michael Ovitz to join forces in the quest to bring an NFL team back to Los Angeles rather than compete with one another for the same facility. Broad and Edward Roski originally proposed bringing a team back to a remodeled Los Angeles Coliseum while Ovitz preferred a new venue in Carson. The NFL asked Ovitz to make a proposal for the Coliseum site and indications are that the league prefers Ovitz's plan. The two groups are competing before the NFL to be awarded the franchise.

Ovitz told the Los Angeles Times he intends to stay with his own plan, but is open to suggestions from Broad.

LOS ANGELES DEVELOPERS TALK, BUT REACH NO AGREEMENT ON COLISEUM
June 10, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

The two groups competing for an NFL franchise for Los Angeles have held at least one meeting on joining forces in their efforts, but no agreements have been reached. The meetings came at the prompting of NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue who suggested that investors led by Michael Ovitz and New Coliseum Partners, led by Eli Broad and Edward Roski Jr, join together in the effort.

Both sides have declined comments about the conversations except to say no agreement appears to be near.

GOVERNOR STEPS INTO LOS ANGELES NFL BATTLE
June 24, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

California Governor Gray Davis has begun moves to take over negotiations with the NFL over plans to bring an NFL team back to the city and bypass the commission that oversees the Coliseum where the team would play.

Davis has been talking directly with NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue about the issue and has put a representative into the negotiating process.

The action comes as many, including the NFL, are questioning whether the two competing groups can give the NFL a proposal it can accept by September. That's the deadline set by the league to resolve issues over the Coliseum. The Coliseum was original proposed by a group called New Coliseum Partners, but the NFL also liked a bid by former Walt Disney Co. executive Michael Ovitz. The league told Ovitz to come up with his own plan for the Coliseum and later, after he did, the league told both groups to work together to come up with a common plan.

While the NFL has decided to put a team in Los Angeles, it has not awarded the team to an owner. If the Los Angeles groups fail to create a workable plan, the NFL could put the expansion franchise in Houston where another group has a stadium plan ready to go. The NFL has told that group to stop trying to attract an existing team until the Los Angeles situation is resolved.

The governor has also insisted that while he wants the NFL in Los Angeles, he does not want to spend public money on the deal. That may be a deal-killer because parking is the main problem with both plans.

The Ovitz plan puts parking close to the Coliseum as the NFL wants, but would require significant public funds to build the facility. The New Coliseum Group proposal puts parking more affordably away from the Coliseum, but requires shuttles to get fans in and out. The NFL is against that idea.

NFL CALL FOR MORE PUBLIC MONEY DRIVES GOVERNOR'S AIDE OUT OF LA STADIUM TALKS
August 5, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

An aide to California Gov. Gray Davis has resigned as the state's representative to talks between the NFL and local investors over league requests for more public money to help renovate the Los Angeles Coliseum. Bill Chadwick told Davis he believed the current offering of $150 million in bonds to help pay for parking work was the limit. The new NFL team proposed for the Coliseum would have been charged between $2.5 million and $5 million for use of the stadium.

Chadwick had helped develop the talks between Hollywood mogul Michael Ovitz and partners Eli Broad and Edward Roski over plans to renovate the Coliseum. The two groups had separate proposals, but the NFL suggested they form one group. Chadwick was part of the process that created the proposal made to NFL owners last week.

Chadwick's resignation is seen as a bad sign for additional public money for the stadium project. Local and state officials have already taken hard positions that they not invest tax dollars in the stadium. The proposed bonds for parking structures would have been repaid by parking revenues, ticket taxes and other team-related earnings.

The Los Angeles Times says Chadwick went to the owners meeting with indications that the league would sign the deal. Its refusal and the call for more public investment reportedly caught him by surprise.

The league reportedly has not told Los Angeles officials how much they want the public to invest, leaving local players confused as to what they need to do to secure the franchise. They have until mid-September to come up with an acceptable plan or the franchise could be awarded to Houston.

NFL OPENS FIELD FOR NEW FRANCHISE
August 12, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

The NFL says the Los Angeles Coliseum is no longer the sole site under consideration for the league's 32nd and final franchise, giving hope to Houston officials that professional football could return to their city. The announcement suggests the league has given up hope of reaching a deal on the Coliseum and getting public money to help renovate the facility. The NFL has set a deadline of Sept. 15 for a financing plan to be in place, but most agree that it's not likely to come together.

The group proposing the Coliseum met with NFL owners last month and made a pitch they felt would be accepted, but the owners didn't bite and suggested more public money was needed for the project to succeed. Political officials have already said they have no intention of investing tax money in renovation of the facility.

Now it seems Houston will be the mostly likely beneficiary of that position. Last Spring when the NFL awarded the franchise to Los Angeles, it told Robert McNair, the Houston businessman also bidding for the team, that he could get the team in September if the Los Angeles group failed to develop a workable plan. Many NFL owners preferred the Houston plan because it already had its financing in place, but were lured by the Los Angeles television market.

The sticking point in Los Angeles appears to be parking. The NFL believes parking should be close to the stadium, but construction costs in the area run high. Those bidding in Los Angeles proposed shuttle buses to lower the cost or more close-in parking with proposed financial help from the state, but neither plan won an endorsement.

The Los Angeles effort was led by Ed Roski Jr and Eli Broad who first proposed using the Coliseum. They were later joined by former Walt Disney Co executive Michael who had a competing proposal. The NFL suggested the two work together on the Coliseum site. Even that forced marriage failed to meet NFL requirements. Roski and Broad offered to pay a $500 million franchise fee.

The NFL's decision does not automatically give the franchise to Houston, but puts other sites around Los Angeles on the table. Included are Ovitz's original proposal to build a new stadium in nearby Carson.

NFL officials privately told the Los Angeles Times that the deal must allow virtually all stadium revenue - including parking - to go to the team owner. Rent also must not exceed $1 million annually. In exchange, the NFL would be willing to privately finance the $400 cost of stadium renovation. That promise, however, does not solve the parking problem. If those conditions were met, the NFL would still be willing to consider the Coliseum site.

THEY CAME, THEY SAW, THEY VANISHED IN LA
September 2, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

NFL representatives were in Los Angeles this week for another quick tour of possible sites for a new stadium. The tour lasted only a few hours before the officials climbed back aboard an aircraft and headed back to New York without a hint about their impressions.

The league and local groups will meet several times between now and Sept. 15 when the deadline expires for Los Angeles to present a viable stadium plan in order to hold on to the franchise the league awarded to the city. If that fails, the NFL is expected to put its 32nd franchise in Houston during meetings Oct. 6.

In addition to the Los Angeles Coliseum, where the cost of parking and investment of public money has hindered an agreement, Carson, Anaheim and Hollywood Park are in contention for the franchise. The NFL had previously snubbed those sites.

LA WON'T COMMIT PUBLIC MONEY FOR NFL STADIUM
September 9, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

The Los Angeles City Council decided against a measure that would require voter approval before committing tax money toward renovation of the Los Angeles Coliseum for a new NFL team, but the council also did not put any money on the table. Instead, with one week before the NFL deadline to come up with an acceptable financing plan, the council was divided on how it wanted to proceed.

While some members were open to continuing to talk with the league, others said no public money should be invested at all.

Some council members are considering a tax incremental financing (TIF) district that would fund new parking garages that are holding up the deal. The NFL wants them built close to the Coliseum, but because of the cost, public money would be needed. State officials have said they will not contribute to the project. The NFL also rejected a plan to build garages further away, but use buses to shuttle fans back and forth. A TIF district takes all new taxes generated in the district because of the stadium and funnels it toward a specific project. Because it takes money from all taxing entities, such as school districts, those districts must approve the plan.

IS LOS ANGELES NFL FRANCHISE WORTH $1 BILLION?
September 23, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

Could Marvin Davis be willing to spend $1 billion to bring NFL football back to Los Angeles and build a new stadium at Hollywood Park? That's the rumor that is being discussed in Los Angeles and Houston as Davis' representatives meet with NFL officials.

Davis is new on the scene, but is considered a possible player after other groups failed to give the NFL a workable financing plan for a new stadium. Davis owns an option on land at Hollywood Park where a stadium could be built. The option expires Friday and would cost $250,000 to renew. The stadium is estimated to cost $400 million with up to $750 million going to the NFL as a franchise fee.

In Houston, Bob McNair, who is poised to grab the NFL's last franchise, believes it's all just talk and that it is unlikely that Davis could recover such a large investment.

NFL owners are scheduled to meet again Oct. 5 to consider the fate of the Los Angeles franchise.

OVITZ TAKES OPTION ON HOLLYWOOD PARK LAND
September 30, 1999
Copyright 1999 MediaVentures

The name on the dotted line changed as Michael Ovitz replaced Marvin Davis as the holder of an option on land adjacent to Hollywood Park that could be the site of a new NFL stadium. Ovitz is joined in the venture by Ron Burkle, the billionaire head of a grocery empire. The option expires Oct. 8 when Ovitz must either buy the land for $50 million or have won the NFL franchise. If neither happens, the land will be sold to a housing developer. The league will hold meetings to discuss the franchise and other business Oct. 5 and 6.

At the NFL's insistence, Ovitz abandoned plans earlier to build a stadium in Carson, CA and joined New Coliseum Partners in a proposal to renovate the Los Angeles Coliseum. When the groups failed to come up with a plan that satisfied the NFL, the league opened the bidding to anyone interested.

Davis, investigated, but withdrew from the bidding even after extending his option on the land to give him more time to review the financing. Davis was reportedly unwilling to divest himself of a casino he owns in Branson, MO and plans to invest in a new casino in the Chicago suburb of Rosemont.

The NFL apparently likes Ovitz and it had already approved the Hollywood Park site for a stadium several years ago when the Raiders were considering a new venue. The league has already begun background checks on Ovitz and Burkle and wants the two to ante up $100 million in the next few days to show their commitment to the project. Reports say the Ovitz group expects to pay more than $500 million for the franchise. He will also invest $150 million in the stadium.

One reason Ovitz may find favor among NFL owners is his strength in marketing and promotion. Television ratings for NFL games in Los Angeles are declining and many believe there is no strong support for a pro team. It's believed Ovitz has the marketing savvy to make an NFL team succeed. Others say that while interest may be declining, a small percent of the huge Los Angeles market is still more fans that existing in many current NFL cities. There is also the desire to make sure the league is represented in the county's second largest city.

The other option is to put the new team in Houston where Bob McNair has a plan ready to dust off and put into action. McNair's plan calls for $625 million in stadium costs and franchise fees. Many owners like the Houston plan because its stadium financing plan is ready to go. Others, including Ovitz, believe the league's 32nd and final franchise will go to Los Angeles and another team will be moved to Houston.

Also complicating the issue is Houston's desire to move ahead with its plan. After the league awarded the franchise to Los Angeles, McNair began courting other teams to move to his city. The league asked him to hold off until September 15 when the Los Angeles group was to either produce a viable deal or lose its exclusive rights. If the league does not make a decision during its October meeting, McNair is expected to again begin wooing teams to a new stadium.

ANAHEIM OFFERING DISCOUNT ON LAND
March 30, 2006
Copyright 2009 MediaVentures

The NFL is being offered 50 acres of land in Anaheim for just under $50 million as an inducement to locate in the community. Reports say the land should be valued at about $2.5 million.

The league is talking with Anaheim and the Los Angeles Coliseum about hosting a franchise. The league is not expected to move forward on those plans until its May meeting, although it is being discussed this week during meetings in Orlando.

The stadium would cost an estimated $800 million, which is about $100 million more than its last estimate.

Reports say the higher cost would probably preclude an expansion team coming to Los Angeles since a stadium and franchise fee would cost an ownership group in excess of $1.5 billion - or at least $400 million more than Bob McNair paid for the Houston stadium and franchise in 1999. Other owners felt the cost was in line with other recent projects.

"You find me one NFL owner in the 87-year history of the league whoever complained about investing too much to buy a team," Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay told the Los Angeles Daily News. Irsay's father bought the Rams for $18 million, then swapped it for the Colts.

"Whoever buys a team in Los Angeles, it will be worth $10 billion in our lifetime. I don't know whether it's going to be in 30 years, 18 years, 22 years, but believe it."

WASSERMAN, LEIWEKE BACK IN HUNT FOR NFL STADIUM
April 22, 2010
Copyright 2009 MediaVentures

Los Angeles, Calif. - Plans have resurfaced to build a covered stadium in downtown Los Angeles near the Staples center.

The project is being led by Tim Leiweke of AEG and Casey Wasserman, founder of Wasserman Media Group. They are investigating the possibility of building a stadium where the West Hall of the Los Angeles Convention Center now sits with the idea of replacing that convention space elsewhere in the general area.

So far, the concept is in the preliminary stages, although the NFL is aware of it and is monitoring its progress.

The convention center site is owned by the city. It is within walking distance of the newly constructed 1,000-room hotel that AEG built in the Staples Center/LA Live sports and entertainment district.

The effort is likely to compete with a plan by real estate developer Ed Roski Jr., who wants to build a stadium in the City of Industry. Roski already has approvals and environmental impact reports in place, so construction could start as soon as his group lands an NFL franchise.

John Semcken, the point man on Roski's project, acknowledged that there isn't room in Southern California for two stadium projects, but he said they have no plans to abandon theirs.

"It doesn't change what we're doing at all," he said. "Doesn't influence anything we're doing one bit.

Wasserman reportedly approached Leiweke with the idea last October, touting the site as the most viable and interesting solution for a region that has struggled to find both.

"This is just thinking right now," said Leiweke. "It's saying, 'If we're going to invest this kind of time and money anyway - even if it doesn't cost taxpayers a dollar - shouldn't we think about the other uses if we had a roof to cover it?'"

The vision is that the complex would not only be the quintessential site for Super Bowls but also could play host to the Pro Bowl; the NFL draft (alternating years with New York); the scouting combine (alternating years with Indianapolis); and the finals of the World Cup in 2022. The NFL has made it clear that any new stadium in Southern California should be able to accommodate two teams, leaving open the possibility that the primary tenant could one day share the venue.

The backers believe L.A. would be the ideal spot for virtually every major convention, which could use the stadium along with supplemental space added to replace the West Hall (roughly 14 acres). That's sufficient space to fit the structure of any current NFL stadium.

"This is the final piece to the downtown puzzle," said Wasserman. "It's the only chance for the city to benefit from the economic power of a stadium of this caliber."

Backers say a stadium of this magnitude would have unparalleled revenue streams from a variety of sources, among them naming rights, suites, Super Bowls and seat licenses that would pay for the facility in similar fashion to its neighboring Staples Center.

Buying a team would cost about $1 billion more, but that wouldn't necessarily be required if a franchise relocated with the same owner.

The city owns the convention center, and the support of the mayor and City Council would be essential to the downtown project. There is precedent for such a transaction, however, as Staples Center was built on the site of the convention center's North Hall.

This isn't the first downtown proposal by Wasserman and Leiweke. Eight years ago, they touted building a stadium in South Park, also near Staples Center. They pulled out of that plan, however, when the Coliseum Commission vowed to make its own bid to land an NFL team.

Times have changed, though. The Coliseum has a long-term deal with the University of Southern California, and the commission is no longer pursuing pro football.

National Football League

Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum
Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

Future


BALLPARKS.com © 1996-2013 by Munsey & Suppes.